dryfj.com / drycyclist.com

30/49
Home / Mojave bicycle-camping trips / 2008: Mojave National Preserve Mountain-Bike Camping and Hike / Day 11: Keystone Spring and mine day hike, New York Mountains, Mojave National Preserve /

It appears that rock, silt and wood debris tumbles continually down into Keystone Canyon from the old mine site

It appears that rock, silt and wood debris tumbles continually down into Keystone Canyon from the old mine site The eroding old mine site at the top of Keystone Canyon sits just a few hundred feet below the peak of New York MountainThumbnailsTeal-blue rocks are scattered around the mine site while "Sleeping-head Rock" keeps watch from the right sideThe eroding old mine site at the top of Keystone Canyon sits just a few hundred feet below the peak of New York MountainThumbnailsTeal-blue rocks are scattered around the mine site while "Sleeping-head Rock" keeps watch from the right sideThe eroding old mine site at the top of Keystone Canyon sits just a few hundred feet below the peak of New York MountainThumbnailsTeal-blue rocks are scattered around the mine site while "Sleeping-head Rock" keeps watch from the right sideThe eroding old mine site at the top of Keystone Canyon sits just a few hundred feet below the peak of New York MountainThumbnailsTeal-blue rocks are scattered around the mine site while "Sleeping-head Rock" keeps watch from the right sideThe eroding old mine site at the top of Keystone Canyon sits just a few hundred feet below the peak of New York MountainThumbnailsTeal-blue rocks are scattered around the mine site while "Sleeping-head Rock" keeps watch from the right side

Somewhere around that pile of earth is a mine shaft.