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Returning to the main road, I decide to call it a day and set up camp by the power lines around 18h30 After a mile or so, the road rises out of the wash and I have just enough traction to resume ridingThumbnailsAfter a mile or so, the road rises out of the wash and I have just enough traction to resume ridingThumbnailsAfter a mile or so, the road rises out of the wash and I have just enough traction to resume ridingThumbnailsAfter a mile or so, the road rises out of the wash and I have just enough traction to resume ridingThumbnailsAfter a mile or so, the road rises out of the wash and I have just enough traction to resume ridingThumbnails

I've just hit thick sand on the road, and can't tell if it's just a patch or if it goes on for miles. If the full moon rises in a couple of hours and isn't obscured by clouds, I'll better see my surroundings; if not, I'll see more tomorrow morning.

From here I can see some lights in the distance from Baker, or from Interstate 15, but it's as quiet and dark as can be at my campsite. I was expecting some humming sounds from the power lines and am glad that I'm not hearing anything like that.

A constant moderate wind is coming down the canyon that makes boiling water for my evening add-water-to-bag meal take forever. Tonight is Mountain House Beef Stew, one of my favourites. Like a can of Copenhagen, it satisfies as always.