dryfj.com / drycyclist.com

14/43
A train just passed me on the Kelso-Cima grade After 3.8 miles, I pass Globe Mine Road, where I camped for three nights a few days agoThumbnails I pull off the road for a short break and to refill my Camelbak from my 10-litre water bagAfter 3.8 miles, I pass Globe Mine Road, where I camped for three nights a few days agoThumbnails I pull off the road for a short break and to refill my Camelbak from my 10-litre water bagAfter 3.8 miles, I pass Globe Mine Road, where I camped for three nights a few days agoThumbnails I pull off the road for a short break and to refill my Camelbak from my 10-litre water bagAfter 3.8 miles, I pass Globe Mine Road, where I camped for three nights a few days agoThumbnails I pull off the road for a short break and to refill my Camelbak from my 10-litre water bagAfter 3.8 miles, I pass Globe Mine Road, where I camped for three nights a few days agoThumbnails I pull off the road for a short break and to refill my Camelbak from my 10-litre water bag

When the train caught up to me, the conductor stuck his head out the window of the cab and we waved to each other. This happens twice during my ride up Kelso-Cima Road today.

The uphill trains move rather slowly. When I hear one coming up behind me, it seems to take a bit of time for the train to catch up and pass me. I'm plodding along at about 7 miles per hour on this grade, so the trains must not be climbing at a speed much faster than 20 miles per hour.

Today's destination is on the middle left edge of the New York Mountains, that mass straight ahead in the distance beyond the train.