dryfj.com / drycyclist.com

37/47
A mile after Barnwell, I turn right on the little road to Keystone Canyon, which immediately splits It's hard to tell from a distance if this property at Barnwell is still inhabitedThumbnailsAs a bicyclist, I can choose to ride on either side of the road to Keystone Canyon: do I choose sand or rocks?It's hard to tell from a distance if this property at Barnwell is still inhabitedThumbnailsAs a bicyclist, I can choose to ride on either side of the road to Keystone Canyon: do I choose sand or rocks?It's hard to tell from a distance if this property at Barnwell is still inhabitedThumbnailsAs a bicyclist, I can choose to ride on either side of the road to Keystone Canyon: do I choose sand or rocks?It's hard to tell from a distance if this property at Barnwell is still inhabitedThumbnailsAs a bicyclist, I can choose to ride on either side of the road to Keystone Canyon: do I choose sand or rocks?It's hard to tell from a distance if this property at Barnwell is still inhabitedThumbnailsAs a bicyclist, I can choose to ride on either side of the road to Keystone Canyon: do I choose sand or rocks?

The road to the right leads toward Lecyr Well and Trio Mines, where I camped during my Mojave 2000 trip, while the left road leads to Keystone Canyon, and is my road today.

Back in 2000, I was also intending to enter Keystone Canyon, but I took the wrong branch of the road, partly because it wasn't on the map I was looking at and I had to guess (incorrectly) which fork to follow.