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Home / Mojave bicycle-camping trips / 2008: Mojave National Preserve Mountain-Bike Camping and Hike / Day 11: Keystone Spring and mine day hike, New York Mountains, Mojave National Preserve /

I cautiously approach the spring to test the yellow jackets, and then pump water to fill my Camelbak and water bottles

 I cautiously approach the spring to test the yellow jackets, and then pump water to fill my Camelbak and water bottles Bugs abound at Keystone Spring, as happy to have water as I amThumbnailsMy water supply refilled, I walk back down the hill from Keystone Spring and hike up the road toward New York MountainBugs abound at Keystone Spring, as happy to have water as I amThumbnailsMy water supply refilled, I walk back down the hill from Keystone Spring and hike up the road toward New York MountainBugs abound at Keystone Spring, as happy to have water as I amThumbnailsMy water supply refilled, I walk back down the hill from Keystone Spring and hike up the road toward New York MountainBugs abound at Keystone Spring, as happy to have water as I amThumbnailsMy water supply refilled, I walk back down the hill from Keystone Spring and hike up the road toward New York MountainBugs abound at Keystone Spring, as happy to have water as I amThumbnailsMy water supply refilled, I walk back down the hill from Keystone Spring and hike up the road toward New York Mountain

Fortunately, the yellow jackets are ignoring me, as is often the case when I'm pumping water at springs (I guess they're too busy). Filtering natural spring water from the land always makes me feel closer to my environment.

The water is cool and tastes great after filtering.

It is a bit odd to be in a grassy meadow in the desert. Right now I feel more like I'm on one of my trips in the dry grasslands of Henry Coe State Park than in the Mojave Desert.