dryfj.com / drycyclist.com

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Ah, my 12-mile climb up to the Kelbaker Road summit ends just ahead at the power lines... Climbing up the sometimes-rough pavement of Kelbaker Road; those who have ridden it know itThumbnailsI take a quick break at the Kelbaker Road summit to put on my winter jacket and scarf in preparation for the downhill aheadClimbing up the sometimes-rough pavement of Kelbaker Road; those who have ridden it know itThumbnailsI take a quick break at the Kelbaker Road summit to put on my winter jacket and scarf in preparation for the downhill aheadClimbing up the sometimes-rough pavement of Kelbaker Road; those who have ridden it know itThumbnailsI take a quick break at the Kelbaker Road summit to put on my winter jacket and scarf in preparation for the downhill aheadClimbing up the sometimes-rough pavement of Kelbaker Road; those who have ridden it know itThumbnailsI take a quick break at the Kelbaker Road summit to put on my winter jacket and scarf in preparation for the downhill aheadClimbing up the sometimes-rough pavement of Kelbaker Road; those who have ridden it know itThumbnailsI take a quick break at the Kelbaker Road summit to put on my winter jacket and scarf in preparation for the downhill ahead

As I arrive at the summit at 3800 feet, a vehicle passes slowly and the driver asks out the window if I need a ride the rest of the way into Baker; it turns out to be the Park Volunteer with whom I spoke to earlier down at Kelso Depot.

I'd like to say "yes" for the companionship (I enjoyed our chat earlier), but there should be just enough daylight left for me to reach Baker before dark, or just after.

The slow 23-mile downhill ride from the Kelbaker Road summit here at 3800 feet down to Baker at 925 feet is one that I always enjoy and I would hate to pass it up, though I really appreciate the offer of a free ride.

My headlight battery doesn't have much power left, but it should be enough if I need to use it the last few miles before I reach town (unless strong headwinds cause a delay).