dryfj.com / drycyclist.com

13/36
The strong wind pushes my empty sardine can around while I eat lunch outside Kelso Depot On the last few miles before Kelso Depot, the wind is so strong that I can barely maintain 7 miles per hourThumbnailsNational Parks Service did an excellent job restoring Kelso DepotOn the last few miles before Kelso Depot, the wind is so strong that I can barely maintain 7 miles per hourThumbnailsNational Parks Service did an excellent job restoring Kelso DepotOn the last few miles before Kelso Depot, the wind is so strong that I can barely maintain 7 miles per hourThumbnailsNational Parks Service did an excellent job restoring Kelso DepotOn the last few miles before Kelso Depot, the wind is so strong that I can barely maintain 7 miles per hourThumbnailsNational Parks Service did an excellent job restoring Kelso DepotOn the last few miles before Kelso Depot, the wind is so strong that I can barely maintain 7 miles per hourThumbnailsNational Parks Service did an excellent job restoring Kelso Depot

I'm eating two cans of sardines for lunch. I hold the empty first can while I devour the contents of the second one, to keep the wind from blowing it away and splattering me with stinky fish juice.

I carry tinned sardines on most of my trips because they don't require cooking and thus provide an excellent emergency high-protein meal should my propane burner run out of gas or malfunction.

However, I rarely eat them unless I'm near a trash bin, and I often end up bringing them back home with me. They make for stinky, leaky garbage that one doesn't want to be carrying around a few days until reaching the next trash bin!